As the New Yorkers began to gather to commemorate the 21st anniversary of the horrific attacks on the city and the nation, a former Major League Baseball pitcher who became a police officer in New York City, was killed Sunday morning on his way to work. The assignment he was heading towards was the September 11th memorial ceremony in lower Manhattan.

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Officer, Anthony Varvaro, 37, of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey died Sunday morning. Varvaro was a New York City baseball star, having grown up on Staten Island and then playing college baseball at St. John's. He pitched in the big leagues for a six-years as relief pitcher with the Seattle Mariners, Atlanta Braves and Boston Red Sox.

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Officer Varvaro was killed by a wrong-way driver on the New Jersey Turnpike, as the former MLB pitcher was on his way to the World Trade Center 9/11 ceremonial detail. According to ESPN.com, Port Authority officials said in a statement that Varvaro "represented the very best of this agency, and will be remembered for his courage and commitment to service."

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St. John's University baseball coach Mike Hampton, who was an assistant coach with the Johnnies when Varvaro played for the college, told Theresa Braine nydailynews.com, “Not only was he everything you could want out of a ball player; he was everything you could want in a person.” Just his choice to serve after a six-year MLB career shows you what type of heart was inside of Anthony Varvaro. Officer Varvaro is survived by a wife and four children.

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2022 Capital Region Concert Calendar

Updated regularly so keep checking back!

5 of New York's Most Devastating Invasive Species

Here are 5 species that have invaded New York State and in some cases they must be killed. We are talking about fish that walk on land, plants that cause severe burns and insects that could wipe out a variety of crops that we rely on.

Keep an eye out for these species and you hike, work around the yard or do some fishing this year. Should you locate any of these it is important to report where and when you found them to the New York State DEC.

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