"NFL Royalty", that's how New York Post sportswriter Paul Schwartz described retired New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning on The Drive with Charlie & Dan today. Manning will have his iconic #10 retired and his name will be the 43 Giants player placed in the legendary franchise's "Ring of Honor" this Sunday afternoon at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey. #10 led his teams to two Super Bowl victories, including his 2011 team that will be celebrated later in the season.

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“I just kind of choose to remember the good times in this stadium and the good times in my career and this will be another one I can add to that memory...I think it will be emotional that day, just kind of one last true farewell and a thank you to the fans and the organization and all my teammates,’’ the future Hall of Fame quarterback told Schwartz a few weeks back. Paul wrote an article in yesterday's post about how the Giants CANNOT lose this game.

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Manning will be honored during halftime ceremonies of Sunday's 1pm game vs. the Atlanta Falcons. These halftime ceremonies sometimes worry my buddy Paul Schwartz. "If the home team is on the wrong end of the score at the half — heaven forbid, by double digits — it is nearly impossible for the trending atmosphere to make an instantaneous about-face. The festivities always feel a bit cringe-worthy when the team is getting booed while exiting as the guests of honor start ambling onto the field." Paul wrote in yesterday's post.

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The Giants need to take care of business for a multitude of reasons that go way beyond their halftime ceremonies. An 0-3 start for head coach Joe Judge and Big Blue would certainly make general manager Dave Gettleman's seat go from hot to flaming. Daniel Jones played well last Thursday. Sunday would be a nice time to honor his predecessor with a winning performance.

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