New York Giants running back Saquon Barkley hit another milestone Thursday on his road to the Big Blue backfield alongside Daniel Jones. Barkley participated in the joint practice with the New England Patriots. This is a great sign for Giants fans that await the return of one of their biggest weapons. Head Coach Joe Judge's backfield has been missing number 26 since early in the 2nd game of last season against the Bears. The new leader and Barkley hardly got to know each other.

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According to an article by Paul Schwartz of the New York Post, a friend of the The Drive with Charlie & Dan, Saquon took "eight snaps during Thursday’s joint practice with the Patriots — and it went just fine for the star running back, who is coming off reconstructive knee surgery. He looked as close to himself as anyone could reasonably expect, but he directed his disgust at the red jersey he was assigned to wear. “I hate it,’’ Barkley said. “I hate it.’’

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So for those that are unaware of the meaning of the red jersey in practice, it means "NO CONTACT," not something anyone outside of the kickers and quarterbacks want to wear.

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However, according to Paul, "seeing No. 26 in red was an odd sight, but not a wholly unwelcome one for Barkley.“You have to do what you have to do,’’ he said. “I said in the locker room, I don’t care if it’s pink, orange, yellow, whatever color it is, as long as I’m able get out there and take some reps with my team, that’s all that matters.’’"

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It's a great sign for the Giants to put their injured pieces back on the football field. Tight End Kyle Rudolph was activated to practice yesterday. Free agent wide receiver acquisition Kenny Golladay will be back in days. These are all good signs for Joe Judge, Daniel Jones and Dave Gettleman.

Paul Schwartz does an awesome job covering the Giants. You can read all of his articles at nypost.com and check out his Blue Rush Podcast with Lawrence Tynes

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